How to Find Out When my House Was Built?

How To Find Out When Was My House Built?

Whether you’re curious about the age of your home or need to know for home insurance purposes, finding out when it was built is easy with our quick guide.

Telling the age of a house is more than just a matter of curiosity. It can also be important for historical research or even house maintenance.

Ways to find out when was my house built?

If you’re wondering about the history of your home, one of the best ways to find out when your house was built is to check the property’s title register. T

his document, more commonly known as the title deeds, not only proves ownership of the property but also lists the date when the property was first sold by the developer. If you’re the current owner, your conveyancer should have sent you the title deeds after the sale was completed.

If you don’t own the property or can’t find the title deeds, your next best bet is to check with HM Land Registry.

What is HM Land Registry?

HM Land Registry is the government department responsible for maintaining and updating the land register for England and Wales.

The land register includes information on who owns each property, when the house was built as well as details of any mortgages or other charges on the property.

The agency keeps records on asset ownership worth more than $7 trillion, covering 87% of the landmass in England and Wales.

Anyone who wants to take out a mortgage, buy or sell property must notify HM Land Registry of any changes in ownership status.

Most property transactions in England and Wales are now carried out electronically, and HM Land Registry is working towards making the land register fully electronic by the end of 2025.

The land register is an important tool for property owners, as it provides security of ownership and can help to prevent disputes. It is also used by lenders when considering applications for mortgages and other loans.

Their main office is located in Croydon, south London, and there are regional offices in Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester and Newport.

How much does it cost to utilize HM Land Registry to look for property information?

Currently, it costs £3 per property title search. You can also access their website for free, but you will need to create an account.

How do I search the HM Land Registry website?

To search the HM Land Registry website, you will need to know the address or title number of the property you are interested in.

You can then use the search function to find information on the property and when the house was built including who owns it and any charges against it.

What information is available on the HM Land Registry website?

The HM Land Registry website provides information on who owns each property, as well as details of any mortgages or other charges on the property. You can also find general information about land boundaries and flood risks.

If you’re looking for more detailed information on a property, such as floor plans or architectural drawings, you can order these from their website for a fee..

What’s the best way for me to research previous owners of my property?

If you’re interested in finding out more about the previous owners of your property, the best way to do this is by ordering a copy of the property’s title deeds from HM Land Registry.

These documents list the names and addresses of all the previous owners of the property, as well as the dates when they bought and sold it.

You can also find out more about the property’s history by searching the Land Registry website or using the interactive map.

What is the importance of getting to know previous owners of my house?

There are a few reasons why it might be important for you to find out more about the previous owners of your house.

For example, if you’re planning to carry out major renovations or extensions and would like to get planning permissions, it can be helpful to know if the property has been extended or altered in the past. This information can be found in the title deeds.

It can also be interesting to find out more about the people who have lived in your house in the past, and what their stories are. Knowing more about the history of your house can help you to feel more connected to it.

If you’re attempting to find out the age of your property and don’t know who to ask, previous owners may be able to assist you. Past owners may be able to tell you more or direct you towards additional information if you are having difficulties determining when the house was built.

Finally, if you’re planning to sell your house in the future, potential buyers might be interested in its history. Knowing who previously owned your house and when they lived there could add to its value.

What else can you do to figure out when a home was built?

There are a few ways to find out when your house was built. The most reliable source is the HM Land Registry, but if they don’t have the answer, you can check your mortgage survey or ask your local authority to find out the age of the property.

The survey may indicate the build date of the house, or your local authority might know its age in reference to planning permission grants.

If you live in a Grade II or Grade II* listed building, you might have more luck with the National Heritage List for England (NHLE). The NHLE is the official register of all nationally protected historic buildings and sites in England.

If it is listed there, the NHLE will have a record of your property’s age. Ultimately, a little bit of digging should uncover the answer to your question.

If all else fails, you can always ask your neighbours! They might have lived in the area for a long time and know when your house was built.

Is it possible to determine the year my home was built?

If you’re lucky, you might be able to find out the exact year your house was built. However, for older properties this can be difficult as construction records from specific historical periods are often patchy.

In these cases, the best you can do is to find out the date of the first time the property was sold.

For newer listed buildings (less than 50 years old), it should be possible to discover the exact year of construction and which company/individual built it.

So, if you’re curious about when your house was built and what is the age of your house, it’s definitely worth doing some research – you might be surprised at what you find out!

Why is it important to know how old my house is?

There are a few reasons as to why it would be beneficial for you to want to know how old your house is. The most common reason is for home insurance purposes.

Many home insurance company will give you a discount on your home insurance premiums if your property is of a certain age or newer.

Other reasons of wanting to find out the history or age of the property is to see if it is eligible for certain grants or conservation programs.

It’s also beneficial to know the age of your home or when the property was built since it may encourage you to conduct necessary inspections on any age-related issues.

If you find out that your home was built more than 50 years old and has never had a roof check, for example, you might want to have one done.

What other ways can I find out how old is my house and when a property was built?

1. Look through your local archives.

If you live in the UK, your local authority should hold records of all properties in the area. These will include the property build date.

2. Get in touch with your local history society.

Another useful source of information on older properties is your local history society. They may have records of when each

3. Look up the previous owners of your property.

You might be able to find out when your house was built by looking up the previous owners. The Land Registry holds records of who owns each property in the UK, so you should be able to track down past owners quite easily.

4. Check the deeds to your property.

If you’re the owner of your property, you should have a copy of the deeds in your possession. The deeds will usually include information on when the property was built.

5. Hire a professional historian.

If you’ve exhausted all other avenues, you could always hire a professional historian to carry out some research for you. This is likely to be a costly option, but it would give you peace of mind that you’re getting accurate information.

6. Search for planning permission and building control applications.

Another way to find out when a property was built is to search for planning permission and building control applications. These are usually public documents, so you should be able to access them quite easily.

7. Check the Census records.

The UK Census is carried out every 10 years, and the records are a valuable source of information on properties and their occupants. The most recent Census was carried out in 2011, but you can also check record offices and access information from previous Censuses.

8. Local estate agents

Local estate agents are likely to have records of when properties in the area were built. They may also be able to give you some insight into the history of your property.

What’ is considered as an old house?

The definition of an old house can vary depending on who you ask, but generally speaking, an old house is any property that is more than 50 years old. properties that are 100 years old or more are often referred to as ‘historic’ houses.

It’s possible that your house is a “period home” if it’s quite ancient. This means it is from the same architectural era as the local historical society’s museum.

The United Kingdom has its fair share of ancient homes, but only if they were built before 1940 are they considered “old.” They’re mostly referred to in more beneficial ways, such as as to the era in history when they were constructed.

Unless you live in a castle, your house is likely to be one of the following:


Tudor – If your house was built between 1485 and 1603, it’s Tudor. Tudor houses are easy to spot because they have exposed timber beams on the outside of the building, which were used to support the weight of the roofs.

Elizabethan – If your property was built between 1558 and 1603, it’s Elizabethan. These houses are similar to Tudor houses in that they have exposed timber beams, but they also often have ornate plasterwork on the ceilings.

Jacobean – If your house was built between 1603 and 1649, it’s Jacobean. These houses are distinguished by their grandeur and symmetry. They often have large, impressive fireplaces and ornate plasterwork on the ceilings.

Georgian – If your property was built between 1714 and 1830, it’s Georgian. Georgian houses are known for their simple, classical architectural style. They often have sash windows and are built of brick or stone.

Victorian – If your house was built between 1837 and 1901, it’s Victorian. These houses are usually quite ornate, with decorative features such as bay windows and wrought iron balconies.

Edwardian – If your property was built between 1901 and 1910, it’s Edwardian. Edwardian houses are similar to Victorian houses, but they tend to be less ornate and more functional.

Interwar – If your house was built between 1918 and 1939, it’s interwar. These houses are often a mix of styles, as different architects experimented with different designs during this period.

Modern – If your property was built after 1945, it’s classed as modern. Modern houses come in all shapes and sizes, but they tend to be more functional than ornate.

Related posts

best places to live in london

Best Places To Live In London | London Neighborhoods

Read More

Free Things To Do in London

Read More

The Complete Guide To Residential Block Management

Read More

Join The Discussion

Search

December 2022

  • M
  • T
  • W
  • T
  • F
  • S
  • S
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31

January 2023

  • M
  • T
  • W
  • T
  • F
  • S
  • S
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • 16
  • 17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • 21
  • 22
  • 23
  • 24
  • 25
  • 26
  • 27
  • 28
  • 29
  • 30
  • 31
0 Adults
0 Children
Size
Rent Per Week
Amenities
Facilities

Compare listings

Compare