What is Rent Guarantor?

What is Rent Guarantor?

A guarantor agreement is a contract between two parties in which one party agrees to be held liable for the debt or obligations of the other party. In the context of renting, a guarantor is usually someone who agrees to be financially responsible for the rent if the tenant is unable to pay.

They sign a contract that establishes their obligations and when they are liable. In the United Kingdom, guarantors are typically for the following types of individuals:

– students from abroad studying at a UK institution

– Those with poor credit histories and low income

– Self-employed individuals

– move to the UK from overseas

– first time tenants

Why would I need a rent guarantor?

There are a number of reasons why you might need a guarantor.

For example, if you’re an overseas student studying in the UK, you may be required to have a guarantor in order to rent accommodation. This is because landlords often perceive students as being a higher risk, as they may not have a regular income or have established credit history to pay your rent.

Similarly, if you have a poor credit history, you may also be required to have a guarantor in order to rent property. This is because landlords will view you as being a higher risk tenant, and may be concerned that you will struggle to keep up with rent payments.

Who can be a rent guarantor?

There are a few requirements that your guarantor must meet in order for them to be eligible.

First and foremost, they must be a UK resident with a good credit history. They will also need to have a regular income, and be prepared to cover your unpaid rent if you are unable to do so.

Although guarantors are often a family member or close friend of the tenant, they don’t have to be. Guarantors need to have a good credit history and an income or savings above a certain amount.


Landlords might require more information or reject a guarantor if, for example:

– the guarantor doesn’t earn enough money

– the guarantor is already guarantor for someone else

– the guarantor is don’t own a property in the UK

– not a UK guarantor

– the guarantor is under 18 years old

– the guarantor is retried

What to do if you can’t find a guarantor?

If you’re struggling to find and get a guarantor your potential rental accommodation, there are a few things you can do.

First, try asking a close friend or family member if they would be willing to act as your guarantor. If they agree, make sure that you explain the requirements and responsibilities to them in detail so that they understand what they are agreeing to.

Guarantor Service

If you’re still struggling to find a guarantor, there are a few companies that offer guarantor services. These companies will act as your guarantor in exchange for a fee, and can often be a helpful solution if you’re struggling to find someone willing to act as your guarantor.

Before signing up for a guarantor service, make sure that you understand the fees involved and the requirements of the agreement.

Government and Charity

Some councils and organizations provide property rent deposit, bond, and guarantee programs that may support you if you’re struggling to find a guarantor. These programs typically involve the council or organization paying your rent in advance, and you then repaying them over time. If you’re on a low income, you may also be eligible for government benefits that can help with your rent payments.

Students Benefits

Check with your university or college for any financial aid or assistance. They might need to provide you with:

– a student bursary or scholarship

– student rent payment assistance

– emergency funding

– student assistance with deposits or guarantors.

What is a guarantor agreement?

The guarantor agreement is a contract between two parties, in which one party agrees to act as a financial guarantor for the other. This means that if the second party defaults on their responsibilities, the first party will be responsible for repaying them.

The guarantor agreement will outline the obligations of both parties, and should be signed by both the tenant and the guarantor.

It’s important to read the agreement carefully before you sign it, as it will outline your rights and responsibilities as a guarantor.

Things to consider before agreeing to be a rent guarantor

If you’re considering acting as a guarantor for someone, there are a few things you should take into consideration before agreeing to do so.

First and foremost, you should make sure that you understand the obligations of being a guarantor. This includes understanding that you will be responsible for making rent payments if the tenant is unable to do so, and that you could be held liable for damages if the tenant causes any damage to the property.

Additionally, you should make sure that you’re comfortable with the financial responsibility of being a guarantor. This means having the financial means to cover rent payments if the tenant is unable to do so, and being aware of the risks involved in guarantor agreements.

Finally, you should make sure that you trust the tenant. This is important, as you’ll be financially responsible for their rent payments if they’re unable to make them.

When your guarantor can be asked to pay

If the tenant doesn’t pay rent, the landlord can request that the guarantor cover the outstanding amount. And if the tenant damages the property, the landlord can request that the guarantor cover the cost of repairs.

Finally, if the tenant breaches the terms of their tenancy agreement, the landlord can request that the guarantor cover the cost of damages.

It’s important to note that the landlord can only request that the guarantor cover the cost of damages, and cannot force the guarantor to pay.

What is the validity of a guarantor agreement?

There is no set duration for a guarantor agreement. It is determined by the landlord and the guarantor’s agreement.

If your rent guarantor doesn’t want their responsibility to extend beyond the end of a fixed term tenancy, they should speak with the landlord. This should be made clear in the contract if the landlord agrees.

Guarantors for a joint tenancy

Being a joint tenant carries the weight of ‘jointly and severally liable’ for rent, meaning each person is held collectively responsible for the full amount of rent – not just their share.

A guarantor agreement for a joint tenancy is similar to how it works when you have only one tenant. A guarantor will be liable for all of the tenants’ rent unless something in the agreement states otherwise.

If there are multiple rent guarantors, each one should sign and agree to any changes made on the guarantor agreement. Doing so creates piece of mind and avoids potential conflict down the road.

When a guarantor agreement is deemed invalid.

Before agreeing to be somebody’s guarantor, that person should go over both the tenancy agreement and the guarantor agreement with them, as well as explain any risks involved. If the guarantor agreement is found to be unfair or invalid, it may not be legally binding.

Some examples of when a guarantor agreement may be deemed invalid are if:

-The guarantor was not given a copy of the tenancy agreement prior to signing the guarantor agreement

-The guarantor agreement was signed by somebody who is not of legal age (18 years or older in England and Wales)

If the guarantor agreement is unclear, a court may decide if it continues in force.

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