Mould

Mould

Mould (also sometimes called mildew) is a type of fungus, and usually there are two main types you can see easily: black mould and white mould—and both can be dangerous in different ways, but there are some common ways to treat and prevent them.

If the mould can be treated through regular cleaning, and proper ventilation of areas that regularly get humid (e.g. showers and kitchens), then that will remain your responsibility. Some properties unfortunately due to the way they are designed may require more regular attention than others.

If you can show that regular reasonable cleaning and ventilation efforts such as the above are not working, then the Owner will have to take action.

Follow the regular cleaning, ventilation, and other DIY treatment tips given here, and see if the mould spread is reduced.

See if the mould comes back after cleaning. A common problem is humidity not being properly ventilated to the outside, for example from the kitchen after cooking, or from the bathroom after a shower.

If those steps have been tried and are not reducing the mould, please report the issue using our Guest Help Form.

When surfaces become damp and there is poor air circulation, this can cause mould to grow. This is why it is important to keep windows open and allow fresh outside air to flow through all areas of your home, daily.

We will assess, using the help of a contractor experienced in dealing with mould, whether there is a basic issue relating to proper ventilation in the property, that is allowing the mould to grow, or whether further DIY cleaning and prevention steps can be used. Most likely a combination of both will be needed. A dehumidifier may be installed as a temporary measure.

It is very unusual for mould to suddenly appear in a property unless there is a ventilation problem, or cleaning problem. So we will check and compare the current condition of the Property with previous photos to determine if there is history of mould problems, or if they have just started recently. If they have started recently, then likely they can be remedied quickly.

Depending on the severity and the causes, and if any repairs (e.g. installing ventilation solutions) it could take a few days to a few weeks. Early detection is key, so please do keep alert for it and maintain good cleaning and ventilation procedures.

Look at our advice elsewhere in the Property Care section about neighbour issues, and how to alert neighbours and building staff about problems, and follow those steps.

Report the issue to us via the Guest Help Form, and we will escalate it with the neighbour and/or building management and also if needed use the local council’s enforcement measures to ensure the mould is dealt with by the relevant parties.

Mould (also sometimes called mildew) is a type of fungus, and usually there are two main types you can see easily: black mould and white mould—and both can be dangerous in different ways, but there are some common ways to treat and prevent them.

If the mould can be treated through regular cleaning, and proper ventilation of areas that regularly get humid (e.g. showers and kitchens), then that will remain your responsibility. Some properties unfortunately due to the way they are designed may require more regular attention than others.

If you can show that regular reasonable cleaning and venitlation efforts such as the above are not working, then the Owner will have to take action.

Follow the regular cleaning, ventilation, and other DIY treatment tips given here, and see if the mould spread is reduced.

See if the mould comes back after cleaning. A common problem is humidity not being properly ventilated to the outside, for example from the kitchen after cooking, or from the bathroom after a shower.

To kill and remove mould, wipe down walls and window frames with a fungicidal wash, which carries a Health and Safety Executive ‘approval number’. Follow the
manufacturer’s instructions precisely.

Dry-clean mildewed clothes and shampoo carpets.

If those steps have been tried and are not reducing the mould, please report the issue using our Guest Help Form.

When surfaces become damp and there is poor air circulation, this can cause mould to grow. This is why it is important to keep windows open and allow fresh outside air to flow through all areas of your home, daily.

You can make sure that you have adequate heating and insulation in your home to reduce moisture:

– Thermal comfort ranges are very subjective. When at home, the ideal temperature
usually ranges between 19-22 degrees Celsius in the living rooms, including the kitchen and bathroom, and 16-20 degrees Celsius in the bedrooms.

– When away from home, the temperature in the rooms should not drop under 15 degrees Celsius to avoid condensation and increased humidity levels.

– Do not heat up cold bedrooms in the evening by opening the door to heated rooms. The warm and humid air will condensate on the cold walls of the bedroom.

– Good insulation of the building creates warmer walls and ceilings, and therefore inhibits mould growth by preventing condensation from forming on them. Note: tight windows and buildings require more active ventilation.

– Do not block permanent ventilators.

– Do not draught-proof rooms where there is condensation or mould.

– Do not draught-proof windows in the bathroom and kitchen.

– Do not tamper with any ventilation or extract unit installed within your property.

– Keep a small window ajar when someone is in the room.

– If your windows have been recently renewed open the trickle ventilators provided.

– Ventilate kitchens and bathrooms when in use by opening the windows wider, or better still, use a humidity-controlled electric fan if one is fitted.

– Close the kitchen and bathroom doors when these rooms are in use, even if your
kitchen and bathroom has an extractor fan. This will help prevent moisture reaching other rooms, especially bedrooms, which are often colder and more likely to get condensation.

– Do not block air-brick vents.

– Ventilate cupboards and wardrobes.

– Avoid putting too many things in cupboards and wardrobes as this stops the air
circulating.

– Cut a ventilation slot in the back of each shelf or use slatted shelves.

– Where possible, position wardrobes and furniture against internal walls.

– Cover pans and do not leave kettles boiling.

– Avoid using paraffin and portable bottled gas heaters as these heaters produce a lot of moisture in the air.

– Do not dry washing on radiators.

– Dry washing outdoors on a line, or put in the bathroom with the door closed and the window open or fan on.

We will assess, using the help of a contractor experienced in dealing with mould, whether there is a basic issue relating to proper ventilation in the property, that is allowing the mould to grow, or whether further DIY cleaning and prevention steps can be used. Most likely a combination of both will be needed. A dehumidifier may be installed as a temporary measure.

It is very unusual for mould to suddenly appear in a property unless there is a ventilation problem, or cleaning problem. So we will check and compare the current condition of the Property with previous photos to determine if there is history of mould problems, or if they have just started recently. If they have started recently, then likely they can be remedied quickly.

Depending on the severity and the causes, and if any repairs (e.g. installing ventilation solutions) it could take a few days to a few weeks. Early detection is key, so please do keep alert for it and maintain good cleaning and ventilation procedures.

Look at our advice elsewhere in the Property Care section about neighbour issues, and how to alert neighbours and building staff about problems, and follow those steps.

Report the issue to us via the Guest Help Form, and we will escalate it with the neighbour and/or building management and also if needed use the local council’s enforcement measures to ensure the mould is dealt with by the relevant parties.

Back to more hints and tips about caring for your home

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